“The China connection”

Yuk Sa ( History)

Chang Shi Ja Hwang Kee


“The China connection”

Founder Hwang Kee left Korea in 1935 ( age 21) to work for the Cho Sun Railway Company in Manchuria, China where he met a gifted martial arts master named Yang Kuk Jin in May 1936.

Master Yang initially refused to teach the young Korean, but his resistance was eventually overcome by Hwang Kee’s passion and determination. Hwang Kee studied the Tang (China) method of martial arts under Master Yang until 1937 when he had to return to Seoul.

Master Yang was teaching a handful of private students practicing a Chinese martial art in his home.

There he was able to train in Chinese martial arts. Here he received formal training which included Seh Bop (Postures), Bo Bop (steps) and Ryun Bop (Conditioning). He also trained in Dham Toi Sip E Ro (12 Step Tan Tui) and Tae Kuk Kwon (Tai Chi) where he became a dedicated student.


In 1939 he had to go to work, and became employed at the Survey department of the Cho Sun Railway Bureau. Hwang Kee visited his master regularly. In his spare moments Hwang Kee practiced martial arts and read books from the library. He particularly enjoyed reading about Okinawan Karate, philosophy and astronomy.


He was able to return to China once more in 1941 and visit his instructor, but World War II and the establishment of communist governments in China and North Korea prevented Hwang Kee from visiting Master. In his spare moments Hwang Kee practiced martial arts and read books from the library. He particularly enjoyed reading about Okinawan Karate, philosophy and astronomy. �Then there were a number of wars, initiated by Japan, broke out. There was much strife in the country. This led to World War II. China became a Communist country in 1946, so Hwang Kee could no longer communicate with or visit Master Yang. During World War II it became illegal to practice the martial arts. Hwang Kee spent hours studying books on Okinawan Karate that were available at the library.


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